Treaties relating to Afghanistan

Treaties and Agreements relating to Afghanistan

Historical Treaties and Agreements relating to Afghanistan and India

See below the Treaties and Agreements relating to Afghanistan and India:

Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, ratified on 17 June 1809
Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, 1855
Treaty of Friendship between the Government of India and Amir Dost Muhammad Khan, Ruler of Kabul, 26 January 1857
Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, 26 May 1879
Agreement between the Governments of Afghanistan and India, 12 November 1893
Letter from Sir Mortimer Durand to H.H. Amir Abdur Rahman Khan, Amir of Afghanistan, 11 November 1893
Agreement between the Governments of India and Afghanistan as to the Afghan-Kurram Frontier, 1894
Treaty of Peace between Governments of India and Afghanistan, 8 August 1919

Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, ratified on 17 June 1809

Whereas in consequence of the confederacy with the State of Persia, projected by the French for the purpose of invading the dominions of His Majesty the Ring of the Dooranees, and ultimately those of the British Government in India, the Hon’ble Mountstuart Elphinstone was despatched to the Court of His Majesty in quality of Envoy Plenipotentiary on the part of the Right Hon’ble Lord Minto, Governor-General, exercising the supreme authority over all affairs, civil, political, and military in the British possessions in the East Indies, for the purpose of concerting with His Majesty’s Ministers the means of mutual defence against the expected invasion of the French and Persians, and whereas the said Ambassador having had the honor of being presented to His Majesty, and of explaining the friendly and beneficial object of his mission. His Majesty, sensible of the advantages of alliance and cooperation between the two States, for the purpose above described, directed his Ministers to confer with the Hon’ble Mountstuart Elphinstone and consulting the welfare of both States to conclude a friendly alliance, and certain Articles of Treaty having accordingly been agreed to between His Majesty’s Ministers and the British Ambassador, and confirmed by the Royal Signet, a copy of the Treaty so framed has been transmitted by the Ambassador for the ratification of the Governor-General, who consenting to the stipulations therein contained without variation, a copy of those Articles as hereunder written is now returned, duly ratified by the seal and signature of the Governor-General and the signatures of the Members of the British Government in India, and the obligations upon both Governments both now and for ever shall be exclusively regulated and determined by the tenor of those Articles, which are as follows :

ARTICLE 1ST.

As the French and Persians have entered into a confederacy against the State of Cabool, if they should wish to pass through the King’s dominions, the servants of the Heavenly Throne shall prevent their passage, and exerting themselves to the extent of their power in making war on them and repelling them, shall not permit them to cross into British India.

ARTICLE 2ND.

If the French and Persians in pursuance of their confederacy should advance towards the King of Cabool’s country in a hostile manner, the British State, endeavouring heartily to repel them, shall hold themselves liable to afford the expenses necessary for the above-mentioned service to the extent of their ability. While the confederacy between the French and Persians continues in force, these Articles shall be in force and be acted on by both parties.

ARTICLE 3RD.

Friendship and union shall continue for ever between these two States, the veil of separation shall be lifted up from between them, and they shall in no manner interfere in each other’s countries, and the King of Cabool shall permit no individual of the French to enter his territories.

The faithful servants of both States having agreed to this Treaty, the conditions of confirmation and ratification have been performed, and this document has been sealed and signed by the Right Hon’ble the Governor-General and the Honorable the Members of the Supreme British Government in India, this 17th day of June 1809, answering to the [blank in original] 1224 of the Hijree.

Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, 1855

TREATY between the BRITISH GOVERNMENT and HIS HIGHNESS AMEER DOST MOHUMMUD KHAN, WALEE of CABOOL and of those countries of AFGHANISTAN now in his possession; concluded on the part of the BRITISH GOVERNMENT by JOHN LAWRENCE, ESQUIRE, CHIEF COMMISSIONER of the PUNJAB in virtue of full powers vested in him by the MOST NOBLE JAMES ANDREW, MARQUIS Of DALHOUSIE, KT., &c., GOVERNOR GENERAL of INDIA; and on the part of the AMEER Of CABOOL, DOST MOHUMMUD KHAN by SIRDAR GHOLAM HYDUR KHAN, in virtue of full authority granted to him by HIS HIGHNESS, 1855.

ARTICLE 1ST.

Between the Honorable East India Company and His Highness Ameer Dost Mohummud Khan, Walee of Cabool and of those countries of Afghanistan now in his possession, and the heirs of the said Ameer, there shall be perpetual peace and friendship.

ARTICLE 2ND.

The Honorable East India Company engages to respect those territories of Afghanistan now in His Highness’s possession, and never to interfere therein.

ARTICLE 3RD.

His Highness Ameer Dost Mohummud Khan, Walee of Cabool and of those countries of Afghanistan now in his possession, engages on his own part, and on the part of his heirs, to respect the territories of the Honorable East India Company, and never to interfere therein ; and to be the friend of the friends and enemy of the enemies of the Honorable East India Company.

Done at Peshawur this 30th day of March one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, corresponding with the eleventh day of Rujjub, one thousand two hundred and seventy-one Hijree.

Treaty of Friendship between the Government of India and Amir Dost Muhammad Khan, Ruler of Kabul, 26 January 1857

ARTICLES of AGREEMENT made at PESHAWUR on the 26th January 1857 (corresponding with Jumadee-ool-Awul, 29th A.H. 1273), between AMEER DOST MOHUMMUD KHAN, RULER of CABOOL and of those countries of AFGHANISTAN now in his possession, on his own part, and SIR JOHN LAWRENCE, K.C.B., CHIEF COMMISSIONER of the PUNJAB, and LIEUTENANT-COLONEL H. B. EDWARDES, C.B., COMMISSIONER Of PESHAWUR on the part of the HONORABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY, under the authority of the RIGHT HONORABLE CHARLES JOHN, VISCOUNT CANNING, GOVERNOR-GENERAL Of INDIA in COUNCIL.

1. Whereas the Shah of Persia contrary to his engagement with the British Government, has taken possession of Herat, and has manifested an intention to interfere in the present possessions of Ameer Dost Mohummud Khan, a there is now war between the British and Persian Governments, therefore Honorable East India Company, to aid Ameer Dost Mohummud Khan, to defend and maintain his present possessions in Balkh, Cabool, and Candahar against Persia, hereby agrees out of friendship to give the said Ameer one lakh of Company’s Rupees monthly during the war with Persia on the following conditions:

2. The Ameer shall keep his present number of Cavalry and Artillery, shall maintain not less than 18,000 Infantry, of which 13,000 shall be Regulars divided into 13 Regiments.

3. The Ameer is to make his own arrangements for receiving the money the British treasuries and conveying it through his own country.

4. British Officers, with suitable native establishments and orderlies, shall be deputed, at the pleasure of the British Government, to Cabool or Candahar, or Balkh, or all three places, or wherever an Afghan army be assembled to against the Persians. It will be their duty to see generally that the subsidy granted to the Ameer be devoted to the military purposes for which it is given, to keep their own Government informed of all affairs. They will have nothing to do with the payment of the troops, or advising the Cabool Government; they will not interfere in any way in the internal administration of the country. The Ameer will be responsible for their safety and honorable treatment, while in his country, and for keeping them acquainted with all military and political matters connected with the war.

5. The Ameer of Cabool shall appoint and maintain a Vakeel at Peshawur.

6. The subsidy of one lakh per mensem shall cease from the date on which peace is made between the British and Persian Governments, or at any previous time at the will and pleasure of the Governor-General of India.

7. Whenever the subsidy shall cease the British officers shall be withdrawn from the Ameer’s country; but at the pleasure of the British Government, a Vakeel, not a European Officer, shall remain at Cabool on the part of the British Government, and one at Peshawar on the part of the Government of Cabool.

8. The Ameer shall furnish a sufficient escort for the British officers from the British border when going to the Ameer’s country, and to the British border when returning.

9. The subsidy shall commence from 1st January 1857, and be payable at the British treasury one month in arrears.

10. The five lakhs of Rupees which have been already sent to the Ameer (three to Candahar and two to Cabool), will not be counted in this Agreement. They are a free and separate gift from the Honorable East India Company. But the sixth lakh now in the hands of the mahajuns of Cabool, which was sent for another purpose, will be one of the instalments under this Agreement.

11. This Agreement in no way supersedes the Treaty made at Peshawar on 30th March 1855 (corresponding with the 11th of Rujjub 1271), by which the Ameer of Cabool engaged to be the friend of the friends and enemy of the enemies of the Honorable East India Company; and the Ameer of Cabool, in the spirit of that Treaty, agrees to communicate to the British Government any overtures he may receive from Persia or the allies of Persia during the war, or while there is friendship between the Cabool and British Governments.

12. In consideration of the friendship existing between the British Government and Ameer Dost Mohummud Khan, the British Government engages to overlook the past hostilities of all the tribes of Afghanistan, and on no account to visit them with punishment.

13. Whereas the Ameer has expressed a wish to have 4,000 muskets given him in addition to the 4,000 already given, it is agreed that 4,000 muskets shall be sent by the British Government to Tull, Whence the Ameer’s people will convey them with their own carriage.

JOHN LAWRENCE,

Chief Commissioner.

HERBERT B. EDWARDES,

Commissioner of the Peshawar Division.

Treaty between the Governments of India and Afghanistan, 26 May 1879

TREATY between the BRITISH GOVERNMENT and His HIGHNESS MUHAMMAD YAKUB KHAN, AMIR of AFGHANISTAN and its DEPENDENDENCIES, concluded at GANDAMARK on the 26th May 1879, by His HIGHNESS THE AMIR MUHAMMAD YAKUB KHAN on his own part, and on the part of the BRITISH GOVERNMENT by MAJOR P. L. N. CAVAGNARI, C.S.I, POLITICAL OFFICER on SPECIAL DUTY, in virtue of full Powers vested in him by the RIGHT HONORABLE EDWARD ROBERT LYTTON BULWER-LYTTON, BARON LYTTON of KNEBWORTH and a BARONET, GRAND MASTER Of the MOST EXALTED ORDER of the STAR of INDIA, KNIGHT GRAND CROSS of the MOST HONORABLE ORDER of the BATH, GRAND MASTER of the ORDER of the INDIAN EMPIRE, VICEROY and GOVERNOR-GENERAL of INDIA.

The following Articles of a Treaty for the restoration of peace and amicable relations have been agreed upon between the British Government and His Highness Muhammed Yakub Khan, Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies:

ARTICLE 1.

From the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty there shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the British Government on one part and His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies, his successors, on the other.

ARTICLE 2.

His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies engages, on the exchange of the ratifications of this Treaty, to publish a full and complete at amnesty, absolving all his subjects from any responsibility for intercourse with the British Forces during the war, and to guarantee and protect all persons of whatever degree from any punishment or molestation on that account.

ARTICLE 3.

His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies agrees to conduct his relations with Foreign States, in accordance with the advice and wishes of the British Government. His Highness the Air will enter into no engagements with Foreign States, and will not take up arms against any Foreign State except with the concurrence of the British Government. On these conditions, the British Government will support the Amir against any foreign aggression with money, arms, or troops, to be employed in whatsoever manner the British Government may judge best for this purpose. Should British troops at any time enter Afghanistan for the purpose of repelling foreign aggression, they will return to their stations in British territory as soon as the object for which they entered has been accomplished.

ARTICLE 4.

With a view to the maintenance of the direct and intimate relations now established between the British Government and His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and for the better protection of the frontiers of His Highness’s dominions, it is agreed that a British Representative shall reside at Kabul, with a suitable escorts to Afghan frontiers, whensoever this may be considered necessary by the British Government in the interests of both States, on the occurrence of any important external fact. His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan may on his part depute an Agent to reside at the Court of His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General of India, and at such other places in British India as may be similarly agreed upon.

ARTICLE 5.

His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies guarantees the personal safety and honorable treatment of British Agents within his jurisdiction; and the British Government on its part undertakes that its Agents shall never in any way interfere with the internal administration of His Highness’s dominions.

ARTICLE 6.

His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies undertakes, on behalf of himself and his successors, to offer no impediment to British subjects peacefully trading within his dominions so long as they do so with the permission of the British Government, and in accordance with such arrangements as may be mutually agreed upon from time to time between the two Governments.

ARTICLE 7.

In order that the passage of trade between the territories of the British Government and of His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan may be open and uninterrupted, His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan agrees to use his best endeavours to ensure the protection of traders and to facilitate the transit of goods along the well-known customary roads of Afghanistan. These roads shall be improved and maintained in such manner as the two Governments may decide to be most expedient for the general convenience of traffic, and under such financial arrangements as may be mutually determined upon between them. The arrangements made for the maintenance and security of the aforesaid roads, for the settlement of the duties to be levied upon merchandize carried over these roads, and for the general protection and development of trade with, and through the dominions of His Highness, will be stated in a separate Commercial Treaty, to be concluded within one year, due regard being given to the state of the country.

ARTICLE 8.

With a view to facilitate communications between the allied Governments and to aid and develop intercourse and commercial relations between the two countries, it is hereby agreed that a line of telegraph from Kurram to Kabul shall be constructed by, and at the cost of the British Government, and the Amir of Afghanistan hereby undertakes to provide for the proper protection of this telegraph line.

ARTICLE 9.

In consideration of the renewal of a friendly alliance between the two States which has been attested and secured by the foregoing Articles, the British Government restores to His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies the towns of Kandahar and Jellalabad, with all the territory now in possession of the British armies, excepting the districts of Kurram, Pishin, and Sibi. His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan and its dependencies agrees on his part that the districts of Kurram and Pishin and Sibi, according to the limits defined in the schedule annexed [not reproduced], shall remain under the protection and administrative control of the British Government: that is to say, the aforesaid districts shall be treated as assigned districts, and shall not be considered as permanently severed from the limits of the Afghan kingdom. The revenues of these districts after deducting the charges of civil administration shall be paid to His Highness the Amir.

The British Government will retain in its own hands the control of the Khyber and Michni Passes, which lie between the Peshawar and Jellalabad Districts, and of all relations with the independent tribes of the territory directly connected with these Passes.

ARTICLE 10.

For the further support of His Highness the Amir in the recovery and maintenance of his legitimate authority, and in consideration of the efficient fulfilment in their entirety of the engagements stipulated by the foregoing Articles, the British Government agrees to pay to His Highness the Amir and to his successors an annual subsidy of six lakhs of Rupees.

Done at Gandamak, this 26th day of May 1879, corresponding with the 4th day of the month of Jamadi-us-sari 1296, A.H.

N. CAVAGNARI, Major,

Poltl. Officer on Special Duty.

AMIR MUHAMMAD YAKUB KHAN

LYTTON.

This Treaty was ratified by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General of India, at Simla, on Friday, this 30th day of May 1879.

A. C. LYALL,

Secy. to the Govt. of India, Foreign Dept.

Agreement between the Governments of Afghanistan and India, 12 November 1893

AGREEMENT between HIS HIGHNESS AMIR ABDUR RAHMAN KHAN, G.C.S.I, AMIR
Of AFGHANISTAN and its DEPENDENCIES, on the one part, and SIR HENRY
MORTIMER DURAND, K.C.I.E., C.S.I, FOREIGN SECRETARY to the GOVERNMENT of INDIA, representing the GOVERNMENT Of INDIA on the other part, 1893.

Whereas the British Government has represented to His Highness the Amir that the Russian Government presses for the literal fulfilment of the Agreement of 1873 between Russia and England by which it was decided that the river Opus should form the northern boundary of Afghanistan from Lake Victoria (Wood’s Lake) or Sarikul on the east to the junction of the Kokcha with the Oxus, and whereas the British Government considers itself bound to abide by the terms of this agreement, if the Russian Government equally abides by them, His Highness Amir Abdur Rahman Khan, G.C.S.I., Amir of Afghanistan and its Dependencies, wishing to show his friendship to the British Government and his readiness to accept their advice in matters affecting his relations with Foreign Powers, hereby agrees that he will evacuate all the districts held by him to the north of this portion of the Oxus on the clear understanding that all the districts lying to the south of this portion of the Oxus and not now in his possession, be handed over to him in exchange. And Sir Henry Mortimer Durand, K.C.I.E., C.S.I., Foreign Secretary to the Government of India, hereby declares on the part of the British Government that the transfer to His Highness the Amir of the said districts lying to the south of the Oxus is an essential part of this transaction, and undertakes that arrangements will be made with the Russian Government to carry out the transfer of the said lands to the north and south of the Oxus.

H. M. DURAND.

AMIR ABDUR RAHMAN KHAN.

KABUL:

12th November 1893.

12th November 1893=(2nd Jamadi-ul-awul 1311).

Letter from Sir Mortimer Durand to H.H. Amir Abdur Rahman Khan, Amir of Afghanistan, 11 November 1893

After compliments – When Your Highness came to the throne of Afghanistan, Sir Lepel Griffin was instructed to give you the assurance that, if any Foreign Power should attempt to interfere in Afghanistan, and if such interference should lead to unprovoked aggression on the dominions of Your Highness, in that event the British Government would be prepared to aid you to such extent and in such manner as might appear to the British Government necessary in repelling it, provided that Your Highness followed unreservedly the advice of the British Government in regard to your external relations.

I have the honour to inform Your Highness that this assurance remains in force, and that it is applicable with regard to any territory which may come into your possession in consequence of the agreement which you have made with me to-day in the matter of the Oxus frontier.

It is the desire of the British Government that such portion of the northern frontier of Afghanistan as has not yet been marked out should now be clearly defined; when this has been done, the whole of Your Highness’s frontier towards the side of Russia will be equally free from doubt and equally secure.

Agreement between the Governments of India and Afghanistan as to the Afghan-Kurram Frontier, 1894

The division of the frontier of the two allied States, i.e., the God-granted Kingdom of Afghanistan and the illustrious Government of India, between the Jajis and Turis, Khostis and Turis and Khostis and Waziris from Sikaram Sar to the Laram peak according to the map which was prepared at the Capital, Kabul, on the 2nd Jamadi-ul-awal 1311 H., corresponding to 12th November 1893, on the occasion of the visit of the Mission to His Highness the Amir, has been made as follows:

The line of boundary starts from the Sikaram peak and descends along the Azghanni watershed and thence runs along the watershed to Bargawi. From Bargawi it runs along the watershed (of) Gabzan Sar to the Peiwar Kotal and these watersheds separate the waters (drainage) of Hariob and Kurram. From the Peiwar Kotal (the boundary line) runs along the same watershed to Manri Kandao and reaches Kimatai Kotal. From Kimatai Kotal (it runs) along the watershed of the spur of the hill north and east between Istia and Kurram and (through) Margho, Kandao, llandatti Kandao, Dre Drang, Sparo Gawi, Bar Tangi Sar, Bablol Sar and Kharpachu Sar near the Istia Nullah. From these it descends from the above-mentioned watershed and joins the Istia Nullah, and in this way goes along the-above-mentioned ravine till it (reaches) the (limits) of the culturable lands of the Istia Jajis. (Then) it leaves the above-mentioned ravine and running between the pastures of Jajis and Turis it passes to the western end of the Tewza hillock. (Thence) it (runs) between the culturable lands of the people of Pathan and Kharlachi, and reaches the Lora which it follows, and passing through Lora Khula it runs between the culturable lands of the people of Pathan and Kharlachi, and on crossing the Kurram River it runs between the culturable lands of the afore said people to Sulimani Chowki on the hill near the south (bank) of Kurram. (Thence) ascending the Shon watershed and from there along the watershed of the same hill which separates the drainage of Shpol and Dozegar and Kurram and passing through Zer Kamar, Babkai Sar and Inzar Kandao and Tabibulla Kandao it ascends the summit of Mount Khwaja Khidr, generally known as Khwaja Khurm. From there it runs along the watershed of the hill which makes the water parting of China, Kot, etc., on the Jaji Maidan side and Kurram-it passes through Saide Kotanra and reaches Cherai Kandao. From Cherai Kandao it runs along the watershed of the above-mentioned hill till it reaches the Manz Darwazgai Pass and from Manz Darwazgai (it runs) along the watershed of the hill which makes the water parting between the Manz Darwazgai and Istar Darwazgai ravines it reaches the Chapra Sar watershed. Near Shua Darga it descends from Chapra Sar through Niazo Ghundi or Dorani Mela Sar and along the watershed of Bando Raga to the point of junction of the Shua Darga and Manz Darwazgai ravines-and crossing the above-mentioned ravines by the Lakka Tiga road it follows the above-mentioned road to the watershed of the Ninawar Khwar and Jaji Maidan (ravine) which it ascends to the Walli Hill. It descends along the watershed of the above-mentioned hill to Tirwa Watkai. Thence it crosses the Jaji Maidan ravine to Tirwa Watkai, the second, and circling round the Malli Khel Turi graveyard which is left to Kurram, it joins the foot of the Turkomanzai (spur). It (passes) through the limits of the pastures of Zerpan to Zere Sar, Shamshad Sar in a straight line to Dawe Sar, i.e., to the east of Koh-i-Naryag Sar. From there it runs along the watershed of the hill that divides the water of Khost from that of Kurram and passes through Ghwanda Cherai, Shaona Kandao, Manjarra Kandao, Khost and Kurram Kandao and Guldin Sar. Thence it ascends along the watershed to Shobakghar, i.e., the Inzar Mountain. It goes along the watershed of the above-mentioned hill and thence along the watershed of Shua Algad Sar to Batoi Kandao and along the watershed it basses through Istar Dar till it reaches the point of meeting of the watersheds of Kurram and Khost and Hassan Khels. Thence it runs along the watershed of the hill between Karangai and the country of the Hassan Khel Wazirs and passing through Manjarra Sar and Andarpaia Kandao it descends along the watershed to Tarlai Tangi and (then) crossing the Kaitu stream it ascends along the watershed of the hill which divides the drainage of the Laram ravine from that of the Gorambai and Goreshta (nullahs). It passes through Ucha Laram Sar and Bezo Sar till it joins on to the Laram peak shown in the map. Ends.

I, Sardar Shirindil Khan, Naib Salar-i-Mulki, and I, J. Donald, who have been (respectively) appointed by His Highness the Amir and the illustrious Government of India for the settlement of the details of the above-mentioned frontier, have determined, fixed and marked out as above with mutual understanding the above- mentioned boundary line from the aforesaid Sikaram Sar to the aforesaid Laram peak on the 22nd Jamadi-ul-awal 1312 H., corresponding to the 21st of November 1894 (and declare) it correct. Ends.

Further, it is written that the details of the above-mentioned demarcation are entered in detail on a separate map which accompanies this record. Ends.

KOTKAI:

The 21st November 1894.

J. DONALD,

Officer on Special Duty, and British
Boundary Commissioner,
Indo-Afghan-Kurram Boundary.

Treaty of Peace between Governments of India and Afghanistan, 8 August 1919

The following Articles for the restoration of peace have been agreed upon by the British Government and the Afghan Government:

ARTICLE 1.

From the date of the signing of this Treaty there shall be peace between the British Government, on the one part, and the Government of Afghanistan on the other.

ARTICLE 2.

In view of the circumstances which have brought about the present war between the British Government and the Government of Afghanistan, the British Government, to mark their displeasure, withdraw the privilege enjoyed by former Amirs of importing arms, ammunition or warlike munitions through India to Afghanistan.

ARTICLE 3.

The arrears of the late Amir’s subsidy are furthermore confiscated, and no subsidy is granted to the present Amir.

ARTICLE 4.

At the same time, the British Government are desirous of the re-establishment of the old friendship that has so long existed between Afghanistan and Great Britain, provided they have guarantees that the Afghan Government are, on their part, sincerely anxious to regain the friendship of the British Government. The British Government are prepared, therefore, provided the Afghan Government prove this by their acts and conduct, to receive another Afghan mission after six months for the discussion and settlement of matters of common interest to the two Governments and the re-establishment of the old friendship on a satisfactory basis.

ARTICLE 5.

The Afghan Government accept the Indo-Afghan frontier accepted by the late Amir. They further agree to the early demarcation by a British Commission of the undemarcated portion of the line west of the Khyber, where the recent Afghan aggression took place, and to accept such boundary as the British Commission may lay down. The British troops on this side will remain in their present positions until such demarcation has been effected.
ALI AHMAD KHAN, A. H. GRANT,
Commissary for Home Affairs and Chief of the Peace Delegation of the Afghan Government. Foreign Secretary to the Government of India and Chief of the Peace Delegation of the British Government.

ANNEXURE

No. 7-P.O., dated Rawalpindi, the 8th August 1919.

From-The Chief British Representative, Indo-Afghan Peace Conference,

To-The Chief Afghan Representative.

After compliments-You asked me for some further assurance that the Peace Treaty which the British Government now offer, contains nothing that interfered with the complete liberty of Afghanistan in internal or external matters.

My friend, if you will read the Treaty carefully you will see that there is no such interference with the liberty of Afghanistan. You have told me that the Afghan Government are unwilling to renew the arrangement whereby the late Amir agreed to follow unreservedly the advice of the British Government in regard to his external relations. I have not, therefore, pressed this matter: and no mention of it is made in the Treaty. Therefore, the said Treaty and this letter leave Afghanistan officially free and independent in its internal and external affairs.

Moreover, this war has cancelled all previous Treaties.-Usual conclusion.

Leave a Comment