Punishment

Punishment in Asia

Definition of Punishment in Punishment in the Legal Dictionary. See encyclopedic entry about Punishment In the Legal Wiki Encyclopedia: Punishment.

Related Terms

Punishment: noun

  • amercement
  • avengement
  • castigatio
  • castigation
  • censure
  • chastening
  • chastisement
  • compulsory payment
  • correction
  • damages
  • deprivation
  • disciplinary action
  • discipline
  • forfeiture
  • infliction
  • mulct
  • nemesis
  • penal retribution
  • penalization
  • penalty
  • penalty imposed on an offender
  • penance
  • poena
  • punition
  • reprimand
  • retribution
  • retributive justice
  • talion
  • vengeance Associated Concepts: capital punishment
  • corporal punishment
  • cruel and inhuman punishment
  • excessive punishmentforeign phrases: Nulla curia quae recordum non habet potest imponere finem neque aliquem mandare carceri; quia ista spectant tantummodo ad curias de recordo
  • No court which has not a record can impose a fine nor commit any person to prison; because those powers belong only to courts of record
  • Poena ad paucos
  • metus ad omnes perveniat
  • lf punishment is inflicted on a few
  • a fear comes to all
  • Nemo prudens punit utpraeterita revocentur
  • sed ut futura praeveniantur
  • No wise man punishes in order that past things may be revoked
  • but that future wrongs may be prevented
  • Ubi damna dantur
  • victus victori in expensis condemnari debet
  • Where damages are given
  • the losing party ought to be condemned to pay costs to the victor
  • Interest reipublicae ne maleficia remaneant impunita
  • It concerns the state that crimes do not go unpunished
  • Tutius semperest errare acquietando
  • quam inpuniendo
  • ex parte misericordiae quam ex parte justitiae
  • It is always safer to err in acquitting than in punishing
  • on the side of mercy rather tnan on the side of justice
  • In omnibus poenalis judiciis
  • et aetati et imprudentiae succurritur
  • In all penal judgments
  • allowance is made for youth and lack of prudence
  • Quipeccat ebriusluat sobrius
  • He who offends when drunk shall be punished when sober
  • Melior est justitia vere praeveniens quam severe puniens
  • Truly preventative justice is better than severe punishment
  • Justitia est duplex
  • viz
  • severe puniens et vere praeveniens
  • Justice is double
  • that is to say punishing severely
  • and truly preventing
  • Quiparcitnocentibusinnocentes punit
  • He who spares those who are guilty punishes those who are innocent
  • Reus laesae majestatis punitur utpereat unus ne pereant omnes
  • Poena non potest
  • culpaperennis erit
  • Punishment cannot be everlasting but error or sin will be
  • Judex damnatur cum nocens absolvitur
  • The judge is condemned when a guilty person is acquitted
  • Lubricum linguae non facile trahendum est in poenam
  • A slip of the tongue ought not readily be subjected to punishment
  • In atrocioribus delictis punitur affectus licet non sequatur effectus
  • In the more atrocious crimes the intent is punished
  • although an effect does not follow
  • Judex non potest injuriam sibi datam punire
  • A judge cannot punish a wrong done to himself
  • Nemo bis punitur pro eodem delicto
  • No one can be punished twice for the same offense
  • Transgressione multiplicata
  • Upon the multiplication of transgression
  • let the infliction of punishment be increased
  • Poena suos tenere debet actores et non alios
  • Punishment belongs to the guilty
  • and not others
  • Nemo cogitationis poenam patitur
  • No one suffers punishment on account of his thoughts
  • No one suffers punishment on account of his thoughts
  • Receditur aplacitis juris
  • potius quam injuriae etdelictamaneantimpunita
  • ln order that crimes not go unpunished
  • the law will be departed from
  • The judge is condemned when a guilty person is acquitted
  • Lubricum linguae non facile trahendum est in poenam
  • A slip of the tongue ought not readily be subjected to punishment
  • In atrocioribus delictis punitur affectus licet non sequatur effectus
  • In the more atrocious crimes the intent is punished
  • although an effect does not follow
  • Judex non potest injuriam sibi datam punire
  • A judge cannot punish a wrong done to himself
  • Nemo bis punitur pro eodem delicto
  • No one can be punished twice for the same offense
  • Transgressione multiplicata
  • crescat poenae inflictio
  • Upon the multiplication of transgression
  • let the infliction of punishment be increased
  • Poena suos tenere debet actores et non alios
  • Punishment belongs to the guilty
  • and not others
  • Nemo cogitationis poenam patitur
  • No one suffers punishment on account of his thoughts
  • Receditur aplacitis juris
  • potius quam injuriae etdelictamaneantimpunita
  • ln order that crimes not go unpunished
  • the law will be departed from

Browse the Asian Encyclopedia of Law for Punishment

The Asian Encyclopedia of Law is useful as a starting place for research and a tool to gain a general understanding of a particular area of the Asian law. It provides basic coverage of legal issues and it may suggest topics to review. Search Punishment in the following legal systems:

Resource Legal System
Punishment Punishment in the Bangladesh Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Chinese Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Hong Kong Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Indian Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Indonesian Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Iranian Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Israeli Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Japanese Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Malaysian Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Pakistan Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Philippine Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Singapore Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the South Korean Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Taiwanese Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Thai Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Turkish Legal System.
Punishment Punishment in the Vietnamese Legal System.

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Punishment in Other Legal Encyclopedias

For researching on a foreign jurisdiction, it is usually best to begin with foreign encyclopedias for a general introduction to the national legal system or to the specific legal subject in question. They summarize unfamiliar legal doctrines and references to materials that might otherwise be difficult to find.

Link Description
Punishment Punishment in the World Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.
Punishment Punishment in the European Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.
Punishment Punishment in the American Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.
Punishment Punishment in the Latin American Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.
Punishment Punishment in the UK Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.
Punishment Punishment in the Australian Legal Wiki Encyclopedia.

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Other References

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URI of Punishment Description
https://lawi.asia/punishment The URI of Punishment (more about URIs)

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Related Entries and Entries Mentioning this One: See below:

Punishment

Introduction to Punishment

Criminal Punishment, penalties imposed by the government on individuals who violate criminal law. (Criminal law prohibits behavior deemed harmful to society as a whole, whereas civil law governs private interactions between individuals.) People who commit crimes may be punished in a variety of ways. Offenders may be subject to fines or other monetary assessments, the infliction of physical pain (corporal punishment), or confinement in jail or prison for a period of time (incarceration). In general, societies punish individuals to achieve revenge against wrongdoers and to prevent further crime-both by the person punished and by others contemplating criminal behavior. Some modern forms of criminal punishment reflect a philosophy of correction, rather than (or in addition to) one of penalty. Correctional programs attempt to teach offenders how to substitute lawful types of behavior for unlawful actions.

Throughout history and in many different parts of the world, societies have devised a wide assortment of punishment methods. In ancient times, societies widely accepted the law of equal retaliation (known as lex talionis), a form of corporal punishment that demanded “an eye for an eye.” If one person’s criminal actions injured another person, authorities would similarly maim the criminal. Certain countries throughout the world still practice corporal punishment. For instance, in some Islamic nations officials exact revenge-based corporal punishments against criminals-such as amputation of a thief’s hand-under the law of hud_d. Monetary compensation is another historic punishment method. In England during the early Middle Ages (5th century to 15th century) payments of “blood money” (wergeld) were required as compensation for death, personal injury, and theft.

Penology, the study of criminal punishment, is a subfield of criminology. Criminologists theorize about why people commit crimes and deviate from society’s norms of behavior. They also study how society punishes criminals because different methods of punishment may cause people to alter their behavior in different ways. Thus, criminologists devise theories that not only explain the causes of crime but that also address its prevention and control.” (1)

Resources

Notes and References

  • Information about Punishment in the Encarta Online Encyclopedia
  • Guide to Punishment

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